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Showing posts from September, 2014
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Rare Cabarrus Newspaper  Advertises Real Estate in 1879 Although Editor Edwin H. McLaughlin published The People's Paper in Concord for at least seven years (ca. 1872-1879), only one issue, September 27, 1879, survives. The newspaper masthead notes that the 1879 paper was volume VII (indicating at least seven years of publication), that the paper was published every Saturday morning, and that an annual subscription cost $1.50. Newspapers of the day were extremely political, usually the voice of a particular political party or viewpoint. An editor depended on state, national and international news to fill his pages; generally, local news comprised one or two pages devoted exclusively to personal and church items, social events, and legal and commercial advertisements. The progressive  The People's Paper followed the same formula. Among the advertisements in the September 2, 1879 issue are these two real estate notices. Note in both advertisements that a good well and go
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Cabarrus Connections: Immanuel Lutheran College Photo Courtesy of the Durwood Barbour Collection of North Carolina Postcards, North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives, Wilson Library, UNC-Chapel Hill Immannuel Lutheran College, founded in 1903 by the Missouri Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of North Carolina, was first established in Concord, NC. Starting with only five students, for nearly three years it occupied rooms in the parochial school building of Grace Lutheran Church. The first president was N. J. Bakke, who served as president from 1903 to 1910. The institution offered high school and two-year college curriculum to African American men who intended to enter the ministry or engage in missionary work. Shortly thereafter, women were also admitted to the college. Immanuel Lutheran College, 1945, photo courtesy of Greensboro, NC Historical Museum. In the fall of 1905, Immanuel Lutheran College moved to Greensboro, where for two years it occupied temp
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Early Cabarrus Obituary: Archibald Neely Departs This Life Early obituaries are rare; the earliest known Cabarrus newspaper is the Weekly Gazette (extant copies 1855-1857), and only a few issues survive. Cabarrus researchers often use early Salisbury and Charlotte newspapers, beginning with Salisbury's Western Carolinian in 1820, to fill in the blanks. However, lack of early papers is not the only reason obituaries are hard to find; later newspapers like the Tribune and the Daily Independent did not begin printing obituaries extensively until the 1930s. That is why this Charlotte Journal obituary is invaluable, even though it does not name family members of the deceased. The following is reproduced exactly as printed on September 12, 1845: Rocky River Presbyterian Church , 1912. OBITUARY: Departed this life, on the 29th ult., at the house of John B. Moss. Mr. Archibald Neely, a graduate of Davidson College, in the 25th year of his age. Mr. Neely was born and raised i
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Cabarrus County Fairs Have Been a Tradition  Since the 1870s Today marks the opening of the Cabarrus County Fair, which runs through next Saturday, September 13. Generations of Cabarrus residents have enjoyed the fair, which has its roots in the early county agricultural fairs of the 1870s. The fairs were a way to exhibit agricultural products and teach people about new farming methods. One was held near Poplar Tent Presbyterian Church in Concord and another was held at St. John's Lutheran Church near Mount Pleasant.  In the late 1880s, the two fairs combined to form the Agricultural and Mechanical Fair Association, which constructed fairgrounds near downtown Concord in an area bordered by Union Street, Spring Street, Blume Avenue and Tribune Avenue. That fair closed in the 1890s and wasn't reorganized until 1923, when the fair moved near the intersection of U. S.  29 and Cabarrus Avenue in Concord. While there, horse races drew huge crowds. The fair closed again aft
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Year Book Provides Annual Snapshot of  Cabarrus County Education  The North Carolina Year Book is a terrific reference for providing an annual snapshot of early 20th century Cabarrus County. Image from Archive.org Now that Labor Day weekend has past, it is time for Cabarrus County students to settle into the new school year. Here we take a look at a brief overview of Cabarrus schools in the early 20th century. The "North Carolina Year Book and Business Directory, 1904," published by the News and Observer of Raleigh, listed 71 teachers in Cabarrus County for the year. It appears the many of the students attending school lived in Concord since 29 of the 71 teachers taught in Concord. Schools in the county included Mt. Pleasant, Bost's Mill, Enochville, Gold Hill, Carriker, Glass, Georgeville, Clear Creek, Coddle and Flows. Among the county school teachers were Miss Mabel Barrier, Miss Maggie McAllister, Robert L. Hartsell, Miss Anis Eudy, Miss Emma Lipe, Miss